Beginners Angle of View.

Start to experiment the angles you can shoot from.

 

Angle of view denotes the amount of the scene that is visible in the image. Longer the focal length the smaller is the view of the scene that is going to be captured in the scene. Vice versa, the wider the focal length the larger is the scene that is going to be captured by the lens. Lens format also determines the angle of view. Let's take a few examples to explain this.

The Nikkor 50mm f/1.4D is a standard prime lens. On a full-frame camera the lens offers an angle of view of 46˚. When the same lens is mounted on a DX format camera the angle of view becomes 31˚ and 31' (gets narrowed) because of the smaller sensor and the resulting crop factor.

Let's take another example. The Nikkor AF DC 135mm f/2D is a telephoto lens. A medium telephoto to be precise. This lens too works on both full-frame and crop sensor cameras. On full-frame cameras the angle of view becomes 18˚. Note how the angle of view has dropped considerably compared to the 50mm lens. The same lens on a DX format camera such as the D5200 gives an angle of view of 12˚. That means the angle of view drops down even more because of the crop factor.

Both larger and smaller angles of view are necessary in photography. A larger angle of view is required for shooting vast landscape scenes, cityscapes, forests, group shots and so on. Anything, really, where a large slice of the scene in front of the photographer is required to be captured. On the other hand smaller angle of view is required when you need to capture a very tight composition. Portrait photography is one area where a smaller angle of view is preferred. Another area where smaller angle of view is necessary is macro photography.

 

Related: Photography basics: Angle of view | Techradar

Related: Focal Length and Field of View Explained in 4 Steps | Photographytalk

Related: Equivalent Focal Length and Field of View | Photographylife